How Much Does An 8 Week Old English Bulldog Weight Head Halters – Management Or Training Tool?

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Head Halters – Management Or Training Tool?

Training allows the dog to cooperate with the human, provides the leader with the desired behavior based on mutual respect and yes, I will call it love. A training tool is any prop that the trainer uses to inform the dog of what is required and help it achieve the correct behavior. A training tool can be faded when the dog understands the behavior and finds pleasure and utility in imparting it.

For example, a pinch collar, used gently and correctly, can show the dog that it is possible and desirable to walk nicely on a leash without pulling. Used as a training aid, the bite collar can be faded but the polite leash walk is maintained. The split collar can also be used as a management tool rather than a teaching device. If the trainer does not show the dog how to avoid the collar, the dog will pull when the collar is off and walk nicely only when it is on. Other dogs pull despite the presence of a pinch collar because they are learning to adjust it. In this case, you have not achieved either training or driving.

Control is the act of making it impossible for a dog to misbehave. (Example: put the dog in a crate where he can’t chew the furniture.) Training is the process of giving the dog the opportunity to misbehave, but teaching him to offer the desired action. (Example: leave the dog out of the crate, but teach him to chew only his toys.)

Both training and management are useful techniques. Most dog trainers tend to use both, sometimes at the same time. Take home burglary. We keep the dog as a control device. We keep a close eye on the free-ranging dog, take her outside at the appropriate moment, calmly praise her when she walks and name the behavior. The name then becomes a command. This is training. Burglary therefore consists of both techniques.

I am a firm believer in management. But training is the essential component that actually changes the relationship between dog and owner. It is not enough to stop a dog from misbehaving. Ideally, we prevent the dog from wanting to do this behavior. If I were to admit a bias or preference for one over the other, I would have to admit to favoring training over management.

Too often I hear of dog trainers claiming that a given dog will never be reliable, so they simply recommend never taking it off the leash. I have worked with clients who were told by previous trainers that their dog would never overcome dog aggression, so it should never be removed from their own property. In my opinion, this is simply a management recommendation when we don’t know how to do the training.

Not so long ago, I changed my view on a particular tool. A year ago, I would have called the Halti head halter a management tool. I knew the dogs stopped pulling when wearing them. But I didn’t believe that dogs could generalize the behavior and continue to walk politely once the halter was removed.

I was wrong.

Halti turns out to be either a training tool or a management tool depending on how you use it, just like a collar. Using Halti as a control device is simple. Use treats to numb the dog to the halter. Walk the dog on a halter and be careful not to snap his neck by jerking or letting him jump. It’s that easy. When the dog begins to bark, his head is turned to the side and he finds that he is unable to pull. If we let the dog constantly try and fail to pull, we might be satisfied. After all, we wanted to stop the drag, and we did. But in this example, when we remove Halti, we also remove the good behavior. Take off the halter and the dog pulls.

Why? Since the dog has not learned, its owner prefers to walk on its side without tension on the leash. He just learned that it was either uncomfortable or impossible for him to do anything else. As soon as it can pull, it will.

I discovered the real training with Halti completely by accident. Some of you may laugh and realize that my discovery is no revelation to you. But it was a bit of a surprise for me. Before Frank the Labrador came into my life, I used halters only occasionally. When a penniless elderly lady came to lessons with a wild teenager St. Bernard, I taught the dog to tolerate the halter and sent them on their way. I congratulated myself on giving her a good management tool and warned her that she would have to use it her whole life. The client was thrilled.

Then Frank came. I nicknamed him Pirhana. Four months old. Baby teeth razor sharp. Zero bite inhibition. Master Leash Puller. He didn’t feel the least bit uncomfortable strangling his flat collar as he dragged his owners down the street. They put a bite collar on him and Frank didn’t notice or care. In other words, this adorable little labrador puppy didn’t feel very connected to people. He was insensitive to their needs, unwilling to be petted and unresponsive to their form of training.

I took Frank in to train him and like his owners I found that Frank was not very responsive to me either. This is unusual for me because most of the time when I use good pack management, treats, toys and motivational body language the dogs quickly enjoy and respect me. I then pass this relationship back to the owners and show them how to develop it further. But Frank was different. Frank didn’t care.

In sheer desperation I put Halti on the little booger. But I didn’t use it like many owners do. Many owners use it passively rather than actively. To use it passively, as I described earlier, just put the halter on the dog and he will quickly learn that he cannot pull. He spends most of his time in front of the owner, hitting the end of the leash and correcting himself due to the presence of Halti. You will get a better walk, but only in the form of driving, not training, because when you take the Halti off, the drag will inevitably resume immediately.

I used Halti actively as a training tool. Every time Frank tried to pass me and go as far as the leash/Halti combination would allow, I gently guided him back to my side with a gentle, smooth backward hand motion. Once Frank was at my side I dropped my hand an inch or two. As a result, once Frank was at my side, the slight pressure of the Halti on his mouth disappeared.

Of course, Frank was a headstrong little bugger and I had to do it a hundred times the first day. But we make subtle, micro-adjustments thousands of times a day when we drive a car. Even if we drive straight, we have to make many small adjustments to the wheel to continue steering on our path. The same is true of Halti. Neither Frank nor I considered these modifications to be fixes because there was nothing about them to indicate that he couldn’t immediately try the same pull behavior. And he did. Many times that day.

The next day I noticed that I still had to gently guide Frank back to my side a few times, but not as often as the first day. I never let it deviate more than six inches before making the adjustment. Frank felt a slight pressure on his face as he tried to pull himself forward, and an immediate relief from that pressure as he walked on his side.

Halti is so light that if the dog is not pulling, he will hardly know it is there. Unlike Gentle Leader, Halti does not apply constant pressure behind the skull. The soft leader is a great tool when we want that constant gentle pressure behind the head. It really is a calming agent for reactive, nervous dogs. But Frank wasn’t nervous, he just didn’t care about people’s worries.

Here is what happened. I walked around Halta several times a day with Frank. Each day I noticed he needed less and less reminders to walk by my side on a loose leash. You got used to it. While he never minded the huge leash adjustments his owners put on his bite collar, he did mind the pressure on his face that Halti gave him. Therefore, the puppy decided to avoid it. Constant little experience had shown him that when he tightened the leash, the pressure was on. If he released the leash by walking on his side, the pressure was off. He also figured out during that week that if he never pulled the leash, Halti would never push him. So by the end of the week, Frank was walking along with almost no adjustment to the reminder.

Leadership, as we said, simply makes it impossible for the dog to do the behavior we don’t like. Training helps the dog not want to do the behavior we don’t like. I still wasn’t sure if I had trained Frank or if I had mastered him.

So I took Halti off, attached the leash to his flat collar and went for a walk.

Frank walked like a dream. He generalized the behavior of walking nicely on Halti to walking nicely without it. To be honest, this was a surprise to me because I was looking at Halti with preconceived notions: I thought it was only useful as a management tool. But in this case I actually trained with it because I was able to turn the tool off and keep the behavior.

But something even more profound happened during this process. Remember how Frank was also an uninhibited biter and didn’t care much for human contact? Thanks to Halta and the training technique, Frank began to realize that I was important and important to his life. As a result, he stopped biting me and even started asking for and getting affection.

Being the curious type of person that I am, I used the same technique on five or six other terribly pulling dogs that I had trained. In any case, I showed the dog that bucking forward turned the slight pressure on the Halti and walking right next to my left leg turned the pressure off. Each dog was able to walk nicely without Halti within days.

There are two morals to the story. First, Halti is not just a management tool. You can train with it, and if you do as I describe, you should be able to stop using the tool and maintain your new good behavior. Second, a management tool can become a training tool if you open your eyes to the possibilities. I know I did, and it put another valuable tool in my toolbox.

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